It’s been a very busy week.

In between working with Shika Finnemore, my design and marketing guru, to whip this blog site into better shape, I’ve kept busy with social media and preparing a guest author interview with Mary Anne Yarde of the Coffee Pot Book Club. I’m really excited to be appearing on Mary Anne’s wonderful site. We’ll be discussing The Governor’s Man and the writing of historical fiction in general : researching my Roman Britain era; unexpected surprises I came across while researching; challenges of the genre; which is my favourite character; and any advice I might have for other aspiring historical writers. It’s been great fun preparing the interview, and I’m really looking forward to sharing it with Mary Anne’s vast membership on 25 June.

Over the weekend we took a break to welcome two small members of the family born during lockdown. It was their first visit to our home, a very precious few days blessed with almost perfect weather. Also pretty tiring! We’d almost forgotten how to be grandparents, except by Zoom. How does Weetabix set that hard? I wonder the Romans didn’t use it for concrete. Afterwards we sat down with a drink to enjoy the afternoon sun, and the sudden peace and quiet.

A well-deserved evening drinkie

Back to work with a bang yesterday. My publishers, Sharpe Books, gave me the exciting news that the paperback version of The Governor’s Man will be available on Amazon within a few days. I know so many of you are waiting for the print version to arrive, and I can’t blame you. That cover is quite something!

I’ll post again when the paperback version goes live. Or you can sign up for my newsletter (see right) to be the first to hear. I promise not to flood your inbox!

If you’ve already opted for the ebook version, we noticed yesterday that some downloads may have a glitch in syncing chapter 14. If your copy is affected, you’ll know because the index goes straight from chapter 13 to 15, leaving out a pretty tense scene at Iscalis (Cheddar). The correction upload is now available: just connect your Kindle to the internet and you should find it added to your copy. Whew! Never a dull moment at Rogers Towers.

On which subject, a word about Goodreads. It’s the world’s largest book club, and is crammed full of readerly delights — recommendations, reviews, a bookshelf for your own choices, a reading community, and author pages where you can ask questions of your favourite authors. I’m a massive fan myself, and have been a Goodreads member for quite a few years now.

Unexpectedly Goodreads is also keeping me busy this week, and not in a good way. Some of you know there is another Jacquie Rogers, who writes Western romances, comes from Idaho, and is a brunette. Definitely not me. Try telling Goodreads algorithms that. For now, but hopefully not for much longer since I have emailed the fine librarians at Goodreads, if you search there for The Governor’s Man, you get the other Jacquie Rogers. With my book. And yes, this is hopefully being rectified as we speak.

This whole authoring business is just exhausting.

One more piece of news, which is sort of connected with the paperback launch: my motorbike chauffeur (the wonderful Mr Rogers) and I are planning a little road trip this week. We thought it would be fun to visit some of the significant scenes in The Governor’s Man to shoot tiny clips of video explaining where we are and how the setting features in the book. I won’t be giving any spoilers away. But with so much of our ample British Roman history hidden under in tussocks and grassy bumps, maybe you will suddenly find you live on top of 2000 years of history. Anyway, it’s a nice excuse to get out touring Somerset on our Triumph Tiger while the weather is nice, and before the next wave of Covid hits us.

Plus there will be the thrill of discovering exactly how Jacquie Rogers can’t use Youtube. More in my next newsletter.

2 Comments

  1. I’m looking forward to watching your video clips featuring settings from The Governor’s Man! Cool idea!

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